Sunday, March 29, 2009

Rule # 4



Rule # 4: New shoes are inevitable

I have yet to hear of a pair of shoes lasting a lifetime. Although this is not saying that I would not be interested in an expand as you grow indestructible shoe. I just have not found it yet.
Unfortunately a preschooler is constantly growing which means every few months it's time for a trip to the local shoe store. Sounds pretty painless and even fun to pick out a brand new pair of shoes. The Police Officer will compare designs and try on all kinds of shoes to find the "fastest" ones. Wouldn't it be awful to have slow sneakers? Crash will happily accompany everyone on this trip. As long that is as the shoes are NOT for him. If I were to ask Crash to try on new shoes we would have a complete screaming crying meltdown in the middle of the store. I am quite certain even the speediest and most experienced sales clerk would not be fast enough to get new sneakers on flailing feet.
He will however consent to having his feet measured. Good enough for me. I will buy a size bigger than what he measures. A little room to grow and plenty of time to let him get used to the idea of new shoes.

Crash's rules about shoes:
#1 Shoes should be a constant never changing predictable entity.
#2 New shoes are scary.
#3 New shoes are squishy.
#4 New shoes are not the same.

What's going on:
Crash enjoys predictability and control. Shoes that are perceived as comfortable help him remain regulated and in control. Changing this routine is very challenging and forces him to give up some of this control. He doesn't realize that the new shoes may also be comfortable and is so busy fighting the change he is unable to process this new information. Add to this some of his tactile defensiveness and new shoes become quite a trying experience. Everyone knows you have to break in new shoes before the become comfortable. This break-in period for Crash can be all most unbearable because to him his shoes really do seem too squishy and scary. Add to this he is a preschooler and his thought process isn't quite mature enough to understand.

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